Clues for: Familiar Phrases

Question Answer Value Airdate
End someone's hopes & you've put the "last" this "in the coffin" nail 200 March 13, 2014
End someone's hopes & you've put the "last" this "in the coffin" nail 200 March 13, 2014
Situation here for Bill Tilden at the top of the screen, meaning he has control of the situation the ball is in his court 400 March 13, 2014
Situation here for Bill Tilden at the top of the screen, meaning he has control of the situation the ball is in his court 400 March 13, 2014
A document stating whether a ship carried disease; if not, it got a "clean" one bill of health 600 March 13, 2014
A document stating whether a ship carried disease; if not, it got a "clean" one bill of health 600 March 13, 2014
This "man" is an irrelevant but convenient object to a attack in an argument straw man 800 March 13, 2014
This "man" is an irrelevant but convenient object to a attack in an argument straw man 800 March 13, 2014
This 2-word phrase for a radical transformation comes from "The Tempest" sea change 1000 March 13, 2014
This 2-word phrase for a radical transformation comes from "The Tempest" sea change 1000 March 13, 2014
To avoid responsibility is to do this pass the buck 200 March 3, 2010
A proverb says, "a new broom" does this sweeps clean 400 March 3, 2010
It's the literal interpretation of a phrase meaning to relax or behave informally let your hair down 600 March 3, 2010
When insulted, you might turn a deaf ear or turn this, as advised in Luke & Matthew the other cheek 800 March 3, 2010
This 3-word phrase means to stretch the limits push the envelope 1000 March 3, 2010
A great fuss about something trivial is "a tempest in" this, like chip's mother a teapot 200 February 4, 2009
If we could find him, a soldier who's gone AWOL could tell us that AWOL stands for this Absent Without Leave 400 February 4, 2009
In a song he wrote during WWII Frank Loesser popularized the phrase, "Praise the lord and pass" this the ammunition 600 February 4, 2009
The future is inevitable, at least according to this phrase translated from the Latin "iacta alea est" the die is cast 1000 February 4, 2009
From "Casey at the Bat", when there's a letdown or disappointment "There is no joy in" this place Mudville February 4, 2009
It's said that this implement "is mightier than the sword" the pen 200 May 29, 2008
It's what you're actually doing if you're just out of school & "pounding the pavement" looking for work 400 May 29, 2008
In "A Psalm of Life", Longfellow tells of leaving these behind "on the sands of time" footprints 600 May 29, 2008
Meaning "in trouble", the expression "in" this presumably refers to the briny liquid it's made in a pickle 800 May 29, 2008
Meaning "a greater return for your investment", it reportedly came from military expenditures in the 1950s more bang for your buck 1000 May 29, 2008
Also a magazine founded in 1923, it "is of the essence" Time 200 December 7, 2006
When you "bite the bullet" you do something unpleasant; when you "bite" this, you're dead the dust 400 December 7, 2006
It's what they say about rain in the fourth month of the year & its effect on growth in the fifth April showers bring May flowers 600 December 7, 2006
It's a writer or musician's last work, or the chant of a certain water bird swan song 800 December 7, 2006
Herbert Spencer coined this 4-word phrase to describe Darwin's theory of natural selection survival of the fittest 1000 December 7, 2006
"Born with" one of these "in one's mouth" is a reference to a high-end christening gift a silver spoon 200 June 28, 2006
(Sarah of the Clue Crew reports from a one-room schoolhouse in Old World Wisconsin.) If you want to make a fresh start of things, you need this 2-word expression, like students not too long ago a clean slate 400 June 28, 2006
The expression "Banned in" this city came from that city's enthusiastic censorship of books in the 1920s Boston 600 June 28, 2006
The area to the side of a stage gives us this 2-word phrase for performing without preparation wing it 800 June 28, 2006
Shakespeare's Cleopatra used this expression for her youth, "When I was green in judgment" salad days 1000 June 28, 2006
"Loose Lips" do this was a WWII catch phrase about defense plant workers watching their tongues sink ships 200 January 16, 2006
2,000 years ago, the Roman Sextus Propertius said "absence" does this makes the heart grow fonder 400 January 16, 2006
In several games of pool, it's unlucky to have your cue ball "behind" it the eight ball 600 January 16, 2006
It completes the old maxim "Speech is silvern..." silence is golden 800 January 16, 2006
Meaning simple & basic, this 4-word phrase was never actually said by Sherlock Holmes in any of the Conan Doyle tales Elementary, my dear Watson 1000 January 16, 2006
In war & football, "The best defense is a good" this offense 200 October 19, 2005
When disappointed, we sometimes say "There's no joy in" this town--just like when Casey struck out Mudville 400 October 19, 2005
With skyrocketing medical costs, remember that this is "cheaper than treatment" & "better than cure" prevention 600 October 19, 2005
Arthur Fletcher coined this "mind"ful United Negro College Fund motto about living up to one's potential "A mind is a terrible thing to waste" 800 October 19, 2005
The phrase "handwriting on the wall" goes back to this book of the Old Testament Daniel October 19, 2005
"Don't" do this "to spite your face" cut off your nose 200 January 26, 2004
Make a big deal over something little & you "make a mountain out of" this a molehill 400 January 26, 2004
As it often turns out, "Truth is stranger than" this fiction 600 January 26, 2004
In a bad mood today? I could tell by that "chip on your" this shoulder 800 January 26, 2004
Give up during a fight & you may be forced to "say" or "cry" this relative uncle 1000 January 26, 2004
If you have other, more important things to do, you "have other' of these "to fry" fish 100 September 10, 2001
Big throwing don'ts include "the baby out with the bathwater" & "caution to" this the wind 200 September 10, 2001
In "A Psalm of Life, " Longfellow tells of leaving these behind "on the sands of time" footprints 300 September 10, 2001
William Congreve expounded, "heav'n has no rage, like love to hatred turn'd, nor hell a fury like" this a woman scorned 400 September 10, 2001
This phrase meaning "to betray someone" came from slaves sent illegally via the Mississippi to New Orleans to sell them down the river 500 September 10, 2001
In the '60s this phrase for something that reduces anxiety was popularized by Linus Van Pelt Security blanket 100 March 5, 2001
Ali Baba spoke these words to get into the cave of the 40 Thieves "Open, Sesame!" 200 March 5, 2001
The melodrama & the sponsors of certain early radio serials earned them this nickname Soap operas 300 March 5, 2001
On "Star Trek", the Vulcan salute is accompanied by this 4-word phrase "Live Long and Prosper" 400 March 5, 2001
The Oracle at Delphi told Polycrates to look under every rock to find hidden treasure, hence this phrase To leave no stone unturned March 5, 2001
Edible items you "spill" when you tell a secret The beans 100 July 17, 1998
Beware: Someone who offers you this kind of "sandwich" wants to punch you Knuckle sandwich 200 July 17, 1998
"One Fell" this refers to the quick, fierce move a hawk makes when seizing its prey Swoop 300 July 17, 1998
The phrase "To come on like" these refers to the old-time radio program heard here(machine gun fire) "Gangbusters" 400 July 17, 1998
To give someone you dislike the credit he deserves is to "Give the devil" this His due 500 July 17, 1998
If someone wants you to hurry, he tells you to "get" this metal out Lead 100 June 30, 1998
When too much attention to detail clouds your judgment, you "can't see the forest for" these The trees 200 June 30, 1998
A skeptic takes things this way; the Latin phrase for it was "cum grano salis" "With a grain of salt" 300 June 30, 1998
When you really botch something up, you "make" this meat & potatoes dish "of it" Hash 400 June 30, 1998
Thomas Gray originated the phrase "Far from" this tumultuous group; Thomas Hardy borrowed it Madding crowd 500 June 30, 1998
It's "The shortest distance between two points" Straight line 100 June 18, 1998
It's where something embarrassing is swept Under the rug/carpet 200 June 18, 1998
Pool table piece you don't want to be "behind" The 8 ball 300 June 18, 1998
Shifting your debts is "Robbing Peter to pay" this saint Paul 400 June 18, 1998
Alexander Pope criticized these who claimed to be authorities with "Fools rush in where angels" do this Fear to tread 500 June 18, 1998
It follows "When in Rome..." "Do as the Romans do" 100 April 23, 1997
Long ago this was "as good as an ell"; now it's "as good as a mile" A miss 200 April 23, 1997
It precedes "And master of none" "A jack of all trades" 300 April 23, 1997
It's another way to "add insult to injury" using a common seasoning "Rub salt in one\'s wound" 400 April 23, 1997
The phrase "Hope springs eternal in the human breast" sprang from his "Essay on Man" Alexander Pope 500 April 23, 1997
You may "put" this "on the line" or "where your mouth is" money 100 February 20, 1997
Those who play cricket know an awkward situation is this kind of "wicket" sticky wicket 200 February 20, 1997
David Copperfield knows to accomplish something that seems impossible is to "pull" this "out of the hat" a rabbit 300 February 20, 1997
Something superior is said to be "head and" these above the rest shoulders 400 February 20, 1997
A bright person knows "never" do this to "my door again" means stay away forever darken 500 February 20, 1997
A task that's nearly impossible is compared to "looking for a needle in" one of these A Haystack 100 February 10, 1997
A person who's "easy to read" is described as "an open" this Book 200 February 10, 1997
This adjective often precedes "as a hound's tooth" or "as a whistle" Clean 300 February 10, 1997
When you're up late studying, you're said to be "burning the midnight" this Oil 400 February 10, 1997
When you settle a bill, you "pay" this person, whether or not he's "pied" The Piper 500 February 10, 1997
When a situation goes from bad to worse, it's the time "push comes to" this shove 100 November 12, 1996
Go over something with a fine tooth comb & you'll "leave no stone" this way unturned 200 November 12, 1996
Something on good authority is "straight from" this neigh sayer the horse\'s mouth 300 November 12, 1996
Number of the attempt that's "the charm" the third 400 November 12, 1996
The origin of this phrase is unknown, since chickens don't seem to get angry in the rain mad as a wet hen 500 November 12, 1996
A person with a hidden flaw is said to have feet of this, from a dream image in Daniel 2:33 Clay 100 November 16, 1995
Many aquatic animals swim open-mouthed & appear to drink constantly, hence the phrase "to drink like" this a fish 200 November 16, 1995
The depressing expression "down in" these is probably derived from a Middle Dutch word for haze Dumps 300 November 16, 1995
Akin to "caught in the act", to be caught this way alludes to a murderer smeared with blood Caught red-handed 400 November 16, 1995
Frenchmen once assumed names in the military, hence this phrase, French for "name of war" Nom de guerre 500 November 16, 1995
Trying to find similarities between New York & L.A. is like comparing these apples & oranges 100 November 11, 1988
The biblical phrase "give up the ghost" means this die 200 November 11, 1988
"He has more money than you can" do this "at" shake a stick (or poke a stick) 300 November 11, 1988
From the tradition of men fighting topless came this saying urging calm keep your shirt on 400 November 11, 1988
Originally a caption in silent Westerns, it returned your attention to the main house meanwhile, back at the ranch 500 November 11, 1988